Ghana’s legal system must embrace IT as it approaches 150 years – US law professor

A US-based law professor encourages authorities and leaders of the Ghanaian legal system to consider revamping their operations.

Prof. Richmong Frimpong Oppong says it is high time for the Ghanaian legal system to embrace information technology (IT) to improve its operations.

“..to date, while the state has enacted various laws and policies to address some of the existing societal challenges, there remain significant gaps that the Ghanaian legal system needs to address.

Accordingly, as the Ghanaian legal system nears its sesquicentennial (150th anniversary), it should embrace information technology to advance its functions and objectives.

This is one of the topics the professor will speak on at the annual JB Danquah Memorial Lecture scheduled for Monday February 21 to Wednesday February 23, 2022.

This year’s conference, themed “This year will focus on ‘The Digital World and the Future of the Ghanaian Legal System: Reflections Ahead of its Sesquicentennial’, will be held at the Academy of Arts and Sciences from Ghana to Accra.

The conference will focus on consumer protection in the digital marketplace and new ways of working organized labor through digital platforms, two areas characterized by asymmetrical legal relationships.

The annual conferences covered many topics that exhibited deep knowledge and stimulating discussions with the aim of advancing the socio-political and economic well-being of Ghana.

As one of Ghana’s most celebrated young international legal luminaries, Professor Richard Frimpong Oppong shares his thoughts on this year’s theme.

As a people, we have grown accustomed to the ever-increasing benefits of our technology-mediated lives. We live in a digital world. Engagement with digital devices, social media platforms, and online business transactions have become commonplace for many of us.

The overarching theme of all three conferences is that, like individuals, legal systems are not immune to the impact of information technology and the digital world it has created.

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The conference is divided into three parts focusing on technology, the access to justice deficit in Ghana and the last on legal practice and education.

The first will explore how information technologies are challenging the regulatory functions of the Ghanaian legal system. He argues that to date, although the state has enacted various laws and policies to address some of the existing societal challenges, there remain significant gaps that the Ghanaian legal system needs to address.

The conference will focus on consumer protection in the digital marketplace and new ways of working organized labor through digital platforms, two areas characterized by asymmetrical legal relationships.

The second conference examines the access to justice deficit in Ghana. It advocates for a broader understanding of access to justice, explores the use of digital technologies to create new pathways to justice in Ghana, and examines the risk of digital exclusion and the threat to inherent judicial independence. to these technologies.

The final topic of the conference will focus on legal practice and education. He argues that information technology can transform legal practice and education in ways not seen since the inception of the Ghanaian legal system. The conference will explore ways in which legal practice and education can adapt to the digital world.